5 thoughts on “SpayFIRST featured in Wall Street Journal Video on Solutions to Dog Overpopulation

  1. Charlsye Lewis

    Hello! I just saw the WSJ video. Howe can I help spread the word? Can Kickstarter fund clinical trials?
    Thanks, Charlsye, Owner, Metro Animals in Fort Worth Texas.

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    1. Charlsye Lewis

      Sorry, I was typing too fast! “How” can I help spread the word? I just shared the video on my business FB page.

      Reply
      1. Ruth Steinberger

        Sharing on your FB page is great. Also getting in touch with shelters, rescue organizations and others who could use help in saving time, money and more. We hope to have a clinic in the coming year in which people can pay one dollar for each thousand they earn; for that the dog will be treated with calcium chloride, receive a rabies vaccine and dewormer–for someone on minimum wage it will only cost $15. For many people on SSI it will be under $10–really lets an organization do a lot more for less.

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        1. TenFeet2Hands

          I cannot gamble with the health of my male Hounds. I have never neutered them and they all live very healthy long lives. This cocktail of NaSo4 sounds iffy, if the Vet mixes it correctly for the particular dog, if the dog dies who and how is that handled, if there are no health issues and the owner is responsible enough NOT to allow their dogs to roam off leash and or ‘accidentally’ breed etc. I must confess, I do live in a small city (100K+/-), with about 4K dogs and all the females are fixed. Our animal control is highly effective in licensing and offering opportunities for spay/neuter annually. I just cannot submit my Hounds to any form of sterilization unless they develop a medical issue for which castration is necessary. Responsible owners do not allow their charges to reproduce, responsible breeders do not over breed and are usually involved with preserving and showing the breed. This chemical sterilization gives me pause for concern. The benefits are never a benefit to the death of even one dog.

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    2. Ruth Steinberger

      That’s a great idea. Right now, with the data already done, it is simply a compounded drug that any veterinarian may use provided they follow the rules of their own state’s veterinary practice act. In much of the south, and the Midwest, shelters continue to release intact animals. This provides an incredibly easy fix for the males and we need to get the word out to rural shelters. A local veterinarian can go and inject dogs, easily fitting all of the supplies and “equipment” (a caliper) into a shoe box (of course any controlled drugs must be stored in a way that is legally compliant). This is not like taking a mobile spay/neuter unit to the scene or having a surgery suite in place before stopping intact release! Other drugs that may be useful as well; Spay FIRST is focused on increasing the awareness of them so that their usefulness is not wasted. Most dogs and cats are surplus and tools are already out there to stop the suffering.

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